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domingo, 1 de mayo de 2016

NASA : NASA’s Juno Mission on Course for July 4 Arrival at Jupiter, Media Accreditation Open .- Medios de comunicación la acreditación está abierta, para la llegada de la Misión Juno de la NASA, el 04 de julio a Júpiter....

Hola amigos: A VUELO DE UN QUINDE EL BLOG., la Agencia Espacial NASA, anuncia que la acreditación de los medios de comunicación está abierta, para la llegada de la Misión Juno a Júpiter el próximo 04 de Julio...
More information..............



Artist concept of Juno and Jupiter
Artist concept of NASA's Juno spacecraft at Jupiter
Credits: NASA
Artist's animation of Juno spacecraft
Animation of NASA's Juno spacecraft traveling to Jupiter.
Credits: NASA
 
Media accreditation now is open for events around the arrival of NASA’s Juno spacecraft at Jupiter on July 4. The spacecraft, which will reveal the story of the formation and evolution of the planet Jupiter, will enter into orbit around the gas giant that evening, five years after leaving Earth.

The event and related news conferences will be carried live on NASA Television and the agency's website. Further details and updates will be announced as they become available.

To cover Juno arrival events at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, media can begin the process of applying for credentials by sending all of the following information to: jplmediacredentials@jpl.nasa.gov.

  • Your name (as spelled on your driver’s license with middle name), title, phone number and work email
  • Country of citizenship
  • If not a U.S. citizen, are you a green card holder?
  • Media outlet name, address, phone number, and website
  • Editor's name, phone number and work email

To allow time for processing and approval, foreign nationals and representatives of foreign media outlets must apply by May 11. U.S. citizens and green card holders representing U.S. media outlets must apply by June 2. For more information about media accreditation, contact Elena Mejia at 818-354-1712 or elena.mejia@jpl.nasa.gov.

Media should confirm they have been credentialed before making travel arrangements. Credentialed media will have access to interview, photo and b-roll opportunities, and media briefings before and after spacecraft orbital insertion. The JPL Juno newsroom will open on June 30.

Juno will make two 53-day elliptical laps around Jupiter, before beginning the mission's science phase. At that point, the spacecraft will begin orbiting the Jovian world every 14 days, from a distance as close as 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers). It will peer beneath Jupiter's cloud tops to learn about the planet's origins, composition and magnetosphere. Jupiter lies in the harshest radiation environment in our solar system, so this particular spacecraft orbit insertion will mark a new achievement in planetary exploration.

JPL manages the Juno mission for NASA. The principal investigator for the mission is Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. The Juno mission is part of the New Frontiers Program managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, in Denver, built the spacecraft. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

More information about the Juno mission is available at:


-end-
Dwayne Brown / Laurie Cantillo
Headquarters, Washington                      
202-358-1726 / 202-358-1077                                                                                                                                
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov / laura.l.cantillo@nasa.gov

DC Agle
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-9011
agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Last Updated: April 29, 2016
Editor: Karen Northon
Tags:  Juno, Jupiter,

NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Burns for Jupiter


Artist concept of Juno and Jupiter
Launching from Earth in 2011, the Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in 2016 to study the giant planet from an elliptical, polar orbit.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech
This graphic shows how NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter
This graphic shows how NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter became the most distant solar-powered explorer and influenced the future of space exploration powered by the sun.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/
 
NASA's solar-powered Juno spacecraft successfully executed a maneuver to adjust its flight path today, Feb. 3. The maneuver refined the spacecraft’s trajectory, helping set the stage for Juno's arrival at the solar system’s largest planetary inhabitant five months and a day from now.

"This is the first of two trajectory adjustments that fine tune Juno’s orbit around the sun, perfecting our rendezvous with Jupiter on July 4th at 8:18 p.m. PDT [11:18 p.m. EDT]," said Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio.

The maneuver began at 10:38 a.m. PST (1:38 p.m. EST). The Juno spacecraft's thrusters consumed about 1.3 pounds (0.6 kilograms) of fuel during the burn, and changed the spacecraft's speed by 1 foot (0.31 meters), per second. At the time of the maneuver, Juno was about 51 million miles (82 million kilometers) from Jupiter and approximately 425 million miles (684 million kilometers) from Earth. The next trajectory correction maneuver is scheduled for May 31. 

Juno was launched on Aug. 5, 2011. The spacecraft will orbit the Jovian world 33 times, skimming to within 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers) above the planet's cloud tops every 14 days. During the flybys, Juno will probe beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and study its aurorae to learn more about the planet's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

Juno's name comes from Greek and Roman mythology. The god Jupiter drew a veil of clouds around himself to hide his mischief, and his wife -- the goddess Juno -- was able to peer through the clouds and reveal Jupiter's true nature.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. Juno is part of NASA's New Frontiers Program, which is managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

For more information about Juno visit these sites:


Updated on 2/3/16 at 4:45 p.m. PT to include revised information about the burn in paragraph 3
DC Agle
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California
818-393-9011
agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Gary Napier
Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver
303-971-4012
gary.p.napier@lmco.com

Deb Schmid
Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio
210-522-2254
dschmid@swri.org

2016-035
Last Updated: Feb. 3, 2016
Editor: Tony Greicius
NASA
Guillermo Gonzalo Sánchez Achutegui
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